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Friday, Apr. 29, 2016

MSDC/Zimmer plan: Community conversations

Friday, March 1, 2013

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From Promote Entrepreneurship | Leverage Innovation | Create Success: A Strategic Economic Development Plan for Saline County, Missouri.

Editor's note: Because the new economic development plan document is nearly 200 pages long, the PDF file could be too large for some readers to download. We'll publish the entire document in smaller sections in coming weeks so everyone will have a chance to read it.

Please note: The PDF version of the document available prior to Friday, March 1, was missing a number of pages. A complete version of the document is now available at the same URL: www.marshallnews.com/files/msdc_finalzim...


To seek answers to the question posed above and others, we believe that every great idea starts with a conversation.

A true community conversation combines imaginative, intense working sessions with public workshops and open houses.

A community conversation is a collaborative planning process that harnesses the talents and energies of all interested parties to create and support a report that represents transformative community change.

Zimmer Real Estate Services and MSDC staff held a total of four community conversations in Sweet Springs, Slater and Marshall, Missouri.

Led by Stacy Sedler, CEO of the Sterling Consulting Group and Troy Nash, Vice President and Nick Parker, Marketing Director at Zimmer Real Estate Services, the conversations benefited the planning effort in many ways. First, the conversations were able to promote trust between the citizens of Saline County and officials through meaningful involvement and education. Second, the sessions were able to foster a shared vision for the report by maximizing community input. Lastly, the input allowed us to tailor the recommendations in a manner consistent with the will and the intent of the community.

The analytical tool of choice to filter the community conversations is the SWOT analysis. SWOT is an acronym for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats. By definition, Strengths (S) and Weaknesses (W) are considered to be internal factors over which a community has some measure of control.

Also, by definition, Opportunities (O) and Threats (T) are considered to be external factors over which a community has essentially no control. SWOT analysis is a method for analyzing a community, its resources, and its environment.

SWOT is commonly used as part of strategic planning process and looks at:

  • Internal strengths
  • Internal weaknesses
  • Opportunities in the external environment
  • Threats in the external environment

SWOT can help Saline County discover:

  • What Saline County does better than the competition
  • What Saline County does better than the other communities
  • Whether Saline County is making the most of the opportunities available
  • How Saline County should respond to changes in its external environment

The result of the analysis is a matrix of positive and negative factors for Saline County to address.

Community Conversation Participants Sweet Springs March 6th
Nicole Knipmeyer, Mary Jo Berry, Mary Ann Keeny, Dee Friel, Tina Reid, Ray and Debra Kinney, Robert Ekstrand, Lewis Bybee, Monte Fenner, Tara Brewer, Carl Winston, Tonya Winfrey, Albert Hartman, C.W. Johnson, Eric Crump, Ken Lewellen, Ken Hughson, David A. Goode and Bob Bernard.

Strengths

  • People
  • Agriculture
  • K-12 Education
  • Health Care
  • Transportation Access
  • Quality of Life
  • Crime Rate
  • State Roads
  • City Roads
  • County Roads
  • Broadband/Internet Access
  • Available Workforce
  • Topography

Weaknesses

  • Business Climate
  • Economy
  • Skilled Workforce
  • Career Training Opportunities
  • Infrastructure
  • Community Support
  • Pro-Business Envir-onment
  • Economic Develop-ment Efforts
  • Higher Education
  • Incentives/Gap Financing Tools
  • Tourism
  • Workforce Development & Use
  • Available Workforce
  • Youth Activities

Opportunities

  • Green Initiatives
  • Green Jobs
  • Tourism
  • Resources
  • GIS/Mapping Cap-abilities
  • Economic Develop-ment Efforts
  • Energy Utilization
  • Higher Education
  • Natural Resources
  • Proactive Government
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Recycling
  • Workforce Develop-ment & Use
  • Financing Capacity
  • Quality of Life
  • Youth Activities

Threats

  • Property Taxes
  • Population
  • Available Workforce
  • Economy
  • Sales Tax
  • Energy Utilization
  • Green Initiatives
  • County Roads
  • Crime Rate
  • Environment
  • Financing Capacity
  • Infrastructure
  • Workforce Development

Community Conversation Participants Slater March 12th
Mayor Stephen Allegri, Gene Griffith, John Fletcher, Tedd Wiseman, Jason Weiker, Levi Thomas, Pete Hollabaugh, Cathie Jeffries, Charlie Guthrie, Norvelle Brown, Stan Hinnah, Kami Lawson, Russy Johnson, Ken Lewellen, Jerry Kirchoff, Gerald Kitchen, Bill Horgan, Anthony Eddy, Bud Summers, Larry Holland, Bill Riggins and James Stanfield.

Strengths

  • Agriculture
  • Leadership
  • Geography
  • Location to transportation
  • Pipeline
  • Available real estate
  • Communication

Weaknesses

  • Negativity -- attitudes against change
  • Lack of technology -- NO broadband in Slater
  • Ideas/creativity

Opportunities

  • Healthcare
  • West Plains
  • satellite
  • Education
  • Marshall Junction I-70/65

Threats

  • Outsourcing of jobs
  • Drugs
  • Federal regulations
  • Similar to other communities of like size
  • Some citizens being closed to change and new ideas

Community Conversation Participates Marshall March 13th
Darlene Dotson, Brandon Wolfe, Ken Lewellen, Suzanne Smith, Sam Moten, Gabe Ramsey,

Peggy Riester, Kyle Gibbs, Diane Green, Mark and Chari Gooden, Sheila Cook, Jeff Mikels,

Dan Brandt, George Brown, Marshon Umaņa, Anner Umaņa, Matt Huston, Amy Crump, Jim Steinmetz, Jackie Finnegan, Jim Finnegan, Corey Carney, Pat Cooper, Donna Huston, Kathy Green, Chris W. Nelson, Bud and Dee Castle, Scott Hartwig, Rebekah Eilers, Mary L. Fangmann, Gene Fangmann, John Huston, Bill Stouffer, Susan Hoffman, Michael Weber, Brad Shepard, Larry & Beverly Holland and Kim Duncan.

Strengths

  • People
  • Work Ethic
  • Volunteerism
  • Care about each other
  • Location -- in the middle by the river
  • "People have the want to"
  • "Get things done"
  • Honesty
  • School district
  • Committed to Leadership
  • College in county
  • Long owned family farms
  • Strong/loyal local businesses -- Agricultural, Missouri Valley College, Conagra, etc.
  • Medical facilities
  • Collaborations bet-ween businesses and community
  • Strong cultural presence
  • County seat -- Marshall
  • Downtown
  • Preservation

Weaknesses

  • Fear
  • Comfortable with status quo/tunnel vision
  • Negative attitudes
  • Tunnel vision
  • Narrow minded
  • Demographics
  • School facilities
  • "If it's good enough for me, it's good enough for my kids"
  • Finances
  • Lack of diverse retail
  • "if it ain't broke...don't fix it"
  • Lack of pride
  • Unable to retain young people/families
  • Affordable housing
  • Lack of jobs for grads
  • "Outsiders" not vested

Opportunities

  • Lack of new ideas -- "unable to open doors"
  • Downtown
  • Ability to change things
  • Tourism
  • Getting ahead
  • Farmers market
  • "Leave a legacy" - part of something bigger

Threats

  • Lack of desire -- "people "ok" with lack of knowledge"
  • Globalization
  • Lack of resources
  • Stagnation
  • Negative attitudes
  • Frustration
  • Dishonesty
  • People focus on weaknesses vs. opportunities
  • Community doesn't necessarily embrace board recommendations
  • Lack of community support
  • Lack of compliance to rules
  • Drugs

Community Conversation Participates Marshall March 23th
Connie Latimer, Barb Utlaut, Dave and Dee Friel, Gabe Ramsey, Dan Klein, Mark and Chari Gooden, Cheryl Zimmy, Kathryn J. Austin, Doris B. Hayes, Susan Pointer, Jamie Nichols, Wayne Crawford, Peggy Ruester, Sheila Cook, Pete Hollabaugh, Alan Criswell, Edith Gilbert, Corey Carney, Ross and Rebecca Early, Amy Crump, John Fletcher, Gene and Mary Fangmann, Barb Parks, Denver Long, Jene Crook, Jim and Jackie Finnegan, Rebecca Long, Stacey Haynes, Mary Ann Piper, Bill and Kathy Green, Shirley Kueker, Monte Fenner, Charles Stephenson, Kay Graves, J. Mitchell, Pete Gochis, Sam Moten, Dan Brandt, Kyle Gibbs, Kathy Borgman, John Huston, Chris Wilson, Trish Fletcher, Barb Berlin, Wanda Latimer, Jim Latimer, Jim Steinmetz, Cathy Cox, Pat Peterson, Greg Gaba, Ken Lewellen, Dave Rimmer, Lee Hamilton, George Hamilton, Lori Matheis, Merlin Aldredge, Shermaine Riggins, Tommy Goode, Jack Uhrig, Sandy Hisle, Pat Cooper, David Keuhn, Dale M. Zank, Chris Corkill, Darlene Dotson, George Brown, Larry and Beverly Holland, Tom Stallings, Sarah Reed, Barbie Criswell, Eric Crump, Kathy Blumhorst, Edward B McInteer, Marie Reeder, Craig Noah, Greg Kempf, Ann Fenner, Russell Griffith, Mike Martin, Norvelle Brown, Anner Umaņa, Tom Blumhorst, Virginia Sprigg, Billy Thiel, Gracie Bouws, Matt Huston, Terry Clark, Susan Hoffman, John Raines, Donna Huston, Kathy Comnett, Charles Cooper, Harry Lightfoot, Mike Diehm, Scott Hartwig, Marshon Umana, Brad Shepard, Phillip Perkins, Chris W. Nelson, Mike Mills, Matt Kueker and Douglas Koehn MD.

Strengths

  • Martin Community Center
  • Geographic Location to I-70
  • Faith & Churches
  • Community Bank
  • Airport
  • Senior Center
  • Utilities
  • Ethanol business
  • Cancer Center

  • Radio
  • Parks
  • Police & Fire Departments
  • High School Rec Facilities
  • Airport
  • Long term Care
  • Great Kids
  • Infrastructure
  • Public Safety
  • MU Extension Center
  • Strong Media Support

Weaknesses

  • Lack of Patronage to Local Businesses
  • School Facilities
  • Public Transport
  • Lack of Community Block Grant Funding
  • Homeless Children
  • Parenting Classes
  • Too Many Public Handouts
  • Substandard Housing
  • "Clean up our town"
  • Too Many payday loan shops
  • "More people need to step up & get involved"
  • Increase of Older Population
  • Younger Population Moving Away
  • Drugs

Opportunities

  • Expand Farmers Market
  • Revitalize Housing
  • Music Organizations
  • Grant
  • Promotional Brochure
  • Website
  • Agri-Tourism
  • "Community Cheer-leader"
  • Missouri River Miles
  • Recreational Tournaments
  • Mass Media
  • Fiber optic Tech Capability
  • College Rodeo
  • Trucking
  • Welcome New Community Members
  • Race Track

Threats

  • Lack of Jobs
  • "Not positive" Public Perception
  • Failure to Act
  • Build Critical Mass
  • "Keep ball rolling forward"
  • Communication -- "across the board"
  • Team attitude "Win-Win"
  • Saline County -- "1 big happy family & ALL working together for County"
  • Drugs

Next week:
Applying the SWOT analysis to Saline County

Online:
Complete plan:
www.marshallnews.com/files/msdc_finalzim...

Sections:
www.marshallnews.com/topic/zimmerplan


Comments
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taxedpayer - With what time and what money? Virtually everything I've mentioned will cost lots of cash to implement. Do you know of anyone interested enough in the town to throw their cash at someone else's ideas? Heck, do you know anyone interested enough in the town to throw cash at it period?

What would cost zero money is banning the ugly tree topping that goes on in town. But the people that perform this "service" are too well entrenched so it probably won't happen for a generation.

The town is, as far as I can tell, run primarily by unelected officials so I suppose it's not particularly surprising people don't want to invest in something they know they will have little to no say in. This may at least partly explain the consistent refusal to pay for new schools.

-- Posted by Akura on Mon, Mar 4, 2013, at 7:24 AM

Akura,

you sound like someone who cares about the community and wants to see it improve. Have you thought about contacting MSDC to see if you could volunteer to help create new opportunities?

-- Posted by taxedpayer on Sun, Mar 3, 2013, at 1:29 PM

Marshall needs something to actually attract people to live and work here. Other than the college and hospital, there's next to nothing.

The town needs well paying jobs, not minimum wage, barely getting by positions. A big issue in town is people can't support local businesses because they don't have any extra cash to spend! They go to Wal-Mart to buy their essentials and that's it.

Good schools alone would make people want to move and stay here, even if they worked somewhere else. At least some of their money would then go into the community.

Several people mentioned the farmer's market. It's going to be hard to expand when most of the farms in the area are focused on huge land area and commodity crops. The town could turn some of the vacant land into community gardens, or sell them as "urban" farms to supply the farmer's market. Installing better sidewalks to make the town more walkable might also help since many people in town have limited access to cars.

The town is also disorganized with no central shopping areas - instead with a half dozen "centers" scattered around with many dilapidated, vacant buildings. Between the poor organization and buildings, and the hacked apart trees (not what was done by the power company), the town looks terrible.

For all of these problems, there's intense resistance to change. Until that changes or is overcome by the people that do want to make the town better, nothing will change.

-- Posted by Akura on Sun, Mar 3, 2013, at 10:13 AM

Chevy,

Hope we at least get a computer repair shop so you can get your caps lock key repaired.

-- Posted by sixty on Fri, Mar 1, 2013, at 8:45 PM

THE MORE I SEE & READ ABOUT THIS "STUDY", THE MORE IT READS JUST LIKE FROM A TEXT-BOOK. I SIMPLY CAN'T IMAGINE HOW ANYONE IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT WILL HAVE THE TIME OR BE ABLE TO TRANSLATE THIS ENTIRE 200 PAGE DOCUMENT INTO AN ACTION PLAN.ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IS "BOOTS ON THE GROUND"; REJECTION; PROMISES BUT THEN WITHDRAWL; SUCESS ONLY AFTER HOURS OF DISCUSSION. IT IS A TOUGH BUSINESS. NOWHERE DO I SEE A CAMPAIGN TOWARDS LOCAL OR EXISTING BUSINESS THAT NEEDS HELP TO START-UP OR EXPAND. NO ONE IS GOING TO SUDDENLY SAIL INTO MARSHALL/SALINE COUNTY & PROVIDE A SIGNIFACANT NEW CREATIVE BUSINESS WITH 500 JOBS. GOOD LUCK MY FRIENDS!!

-- Posted by Chevy on Fri, Mar 1, 2013, at 3:54 PM


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